The Power of a Good Title!

What’s the difference between “Incredible new gadget arrives from the future” and “Visit My Web Site”?

Chances are very good you were immediately drawn to the first title and you probably wanted to explore the content. The second title probably aroused curiosity, some dread and potentially left you wanting… That’s the power of a good title, headline… while we are all taught never to judge a book by its cover, a really good title and headline can make all the difference in the world!

Recently we implemented “Mission Grading” for those creating Empire Avenue Missions. From A-F we use a mixture of automatic algorithmic analysis of your Mission and manual grading to indicate the marketing potential of your Mission. The Mission grading isn’t there to punish you, but rather to show you what we have seen as great marketing tactics.

grading_example

Yes… We want you to game the Mission Grading in a good way. Moving your title from “Visit My Web Site” to something more powerful doesn’t just get you an “A” grade, you actually get your content in front of more people and engage more people with your creativity. We’ve even updated our examples page for more about Missions.

We’ve recently started publicizing your Missions beyond Empire Avenue, so make your Titles count! Make sure to read our Missions examples and other resources on how to craft great Tweets, Facebook posts and more. After all, you want more engagement and we’re here to help you. In fact a good Mission title is like writing a good Tweet, here’s just one resource that can help you – http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Better-Twitter-Headline

Do you have feedback on links that can help people write great content and great marketing? Please post them in the comments, or through the Empire Avenue community here!

24 Comments

    • Terri, it’s so that your Missions are seen by a larger group of people, and maybe they will come play the game or be part of Missions. Us being hidden has not helped Empire Avenue at all. Now people can see exactly who and what. You can however opt out of your Missions being public when the Mission is being created. You can also hide your profile altogether and the same thing will happen 🙂

  1. I get what you’re saying. The titles you prefer are better titles.

    There’s a problem though. The “good titles” don’t often make good missions. My experience so far very clearly shows that mission titles need to set a degree of expectation.

    “Incredible new gadget arrives from the future” might be good but for EA “Come see this incredible new gadget from the future” is often better. Players know that there’s nothing more to the mission than a good honest look at content; no hidden catches.

    If that’s the case – if good mission titles are like blog posts – then why not have a content mission type. Content missions are just about letting content speak for itself. RSS has been a struggle, I know, but content missions powered by RSS would have to have the same title as blog posts. If EA became a site that blogs automatically traded in content to an audience who was willing to go look at it – for some EAs – wouldn’t that be nice and clean?

    • Andrew, I think your title is just fine… I think what we want and what we are trying to say is be more creative that “Visit my web site” 🙂 But yes the idea of Empire Avenue Missions is to promote each others’ content when it comes to visiting web pages. So that is what the Visit Web Page Mission type was initially all about, we’re just really trying to showcase that now!

  2. Everyone in the internet marketing and content marketing knows that great titles are extremely important. But in my opinion, a regular content title and Empire Avenue mission titles are different.

    In content marketing, with a great title, you create curiosity and great expectation. People expect something valuable in the content based on your title. And if your content is true to your title you may get a new customer. If the titles are misleading and not up to the expectations, you are losing a customer.

    But in the case of an Empire Avenue mission title, creating curiosity may not work very well. Give a clear preview of what it is going to be in the content with the title. Leave less room for guessing. Keep minimum expectations and deliver more.

    Be consistent and build “trust”. Most of your customers are returning customers with regards to missions. If you ever use a deceiving title in a mission, you will be losing a lot of retuning customers.

      • Well, I definitely do not want want to give bad examples here 😉 Here is something currently trending – “Weigh in on a blog post about WhatsApp” by (e)JASONRAMSEY. Few things about this mission title.

        – It’s about a current topic and people seems to be interested in it.
        – Clearly says that it is a blog post
        – Probably a comment required
        – the reputation of the mission owner

        Apart from the title, the mission description is pretty simple; check his opinion about WhatsApp in his blog and if you agree or disagree feel free to leave a comment or probably if it is worth sharing, do that.

        So, in my view a great title alone can’t bring attention. It is a combination of:

        a) Attention grabbing title
        b) Mission description and expectations
        c) The trust you have build in EA with your missions and other activities.
        d) and of course the reward.

        I can give a lot of mission examples with great titles but missing all the other elements… lol not a good idea to post them here 😀

      • Why not get rid of mission titles? New Empire Avenue doesn’t want (rightly so) explicit action missions therefore ever mission outside an investment or a gift mission is a “Enjoy this content mission”.

        So that’s the point of the title? You could argue its a pitch for interest but that doesn’t seem to hold up against reality. Interest in purely determined on mission rewards.

        What would I find useful as a mission summary? I’d love to know how fresh the content was. I’ll race to hot new content. I’d love to know what other EA users previously thought of the content associated with the mission.

  3. Andrew, in my opinion, Empire Avenue wants to go more public and into the mainstream marketing. They do not want to keep it as an underground secret society 🙂

    Going public with the missions is the first step and the new Twitter initiative by EA clearly indicates that. So in that case mission titles are extremely important and it is the new door for getting more people coming in.

    With your reputation in the Empire Avenue and the reward you offer, you can create a successful mission a great completion. However, for Empire Avenue to feature a mission beyond Empire Avenue, a good title is required.

    • I agree with you Sunish. They’re looking to appeal to as many mainstream marketers as possible and can’t afford to look like an alternative version of Fiverr.

      My concern, though, is that we’re yet to determine what a “good title” actually is on Empire Avenue. Do you need a clickbait style title when it’s a mission? If you do then there’s something wrong with the way missions work.

  4. I think we should ave the ability to control our own privacy settings. This assists us all in deterring any possible security threat. I am constantly hearing of new identity theft victims who are hacked through social media. Privacy settings control is just another step in what I call preventative maintenance.

    ~ Doc Reo

  5. Sometimes this can also feel like cheating and you can
    run into trouble with not having niche qualified followers which
    will definitely put a big dent in your wallet, which is what
    you are trying to avoid in the first place. You can invite your thousands of contacts and friends to
    view your products. Everybody knows that Twitter
    is all about helping you build relationships so, if you let your
    followers know that you need some help, you’ll probably get a great response to those feelers.

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